HS.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

HS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on quantitative analysis and comparison of the relationships among interdependent factors including boundaries, resources, climate, and competition. Examples of mathematical comparisons could include graphs, charts, histograms, and population changes gathered from simulations or historical data sets.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include deriving mathematical equations to make comparisons.]
HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales. [Clarification Statement: Examples of mathematical representations include finding the average, determining trends, and using graphical comparisons of multiple sets of data.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to provided data.]
HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem. [Clarification Statement: Examples of changes in ecosystem conditions could include modest biological or physical changes, such as moderate hunting or a seasonal flood; and extreme changes, such as volcanic eruption or sea level rise.]
HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of human activities can include urbanization, building dams, and dissemination of invasive species.]
HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on: (1) distinguishing between group and individual behavior, (2) identifying evidence supporting the outcomes of group behavior, and (3) developing logical and reasonable arguments based on evidence. Examples of group behaviors could include flocking, schooling, herding, and cooperative behaviors such as hunting, migrating, and swarming.]
HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on designing solutions for a proposed problem related to threatened or endangered species, or to genetic variation of organisms for multiple species.]
The performance expectations above were developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

Engaging in argument from evidence in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

         Connections to Nature of Science

Scientific Knowledge is Open to Revision in Light of New Evidence

  • Most scientific knowledge is quite durable, but is, in principle, subject to change based on new evidence and/or reinterpretation of existing evidence. (HS-LS2-2)
  • Scientific argumentation is a mode of logical discourse used to clarify the strength of relationships between ideas and evidence that may result in revision of an explanation. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

LS2.D: Social Interactions and Group Behavior

LS4.C: Adaptation

LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

Stability and Change

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.ESS2.D (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS2.E (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7); HS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS4-6)

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.LS1.B (MS-LS2-8); MS.LS2.A (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6); MS.LS2.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS2.E (HS-LS1-6); MS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-1); MS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-7)

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
RST.9-10.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.8 Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
WHST.9-12.5Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (HS-LS4-6)
WHST.9-12.7Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6)
Mathematics -
MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7)
MP.4 Model with mathematics. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
HSN.Q.A.1Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-4),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.2Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.3Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSS-ID.A.1Represent data with plots on the real number line. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.A.1Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.B.6Evaluate reports based on data. (HS-LS2-6)

HS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on quantitative analysis and comparison of the relationships among interdependent factors including boundaries, resources, climate, and competition. Examples of mathematical comparisons could include graphs, charts, histograms, and population changes gathered from simulations or historical data sets.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include deriving mathematical equations to make comparisons.]
HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales. [Clarification Statement: Examples of mathematical representations include finding the average, determining trends, and using graphical comparisons of multiple sets of data.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to provided data.]
HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem. [Clarification Statement: Examples of changes in ecosystem conditions could include modest biological or physical changes, such as moderate hunting or a seasonal flood; and extreme changes, such as volcanic eruption or sea level rise.]
HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of human activities can include urbanization, building dams, and dissemination of invasive species.]
HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on: (1) distinguishing between group and individual behavior, (2) identifying evidence supporting the outcomes of group behavior, and (3) developing logical and reasonable arguments based on evidence. Examples of group behaviors could include flocking, schooling, herding, and cooperative behaviors such as hunting, migrating, and swarming.]
HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on designing solutions for a proposed problem related to threatened or endangered species, or to genetic variation of organisms for multiple species.]
The performance expectations above were developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

Engaging in argument from evidence in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

         Connections to Nature of Science

Scientific Knowledge is Open to Revision in Light of New Evidence

  • Most scientific knowledge is quite durable, but is, in principle, subject to change based on new evidence and/or reinterpretation of existing evidence. (HS-LS2-2)
  • Scientific argumentation is a mode of logical discourse used to clarify the strength of relationships between ideas and evidence that may result in revision of an explanation. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

LS2.D: Social Interactions and Group Behavior

LS4.C: Adaptation

LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

Stability and Change

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.ESS2.D (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS2.E (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7); HS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS4-6)

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.LS1.B (MS-LS2-8); MS.LS2.A (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6); MS.LS2.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS2.E (HS-LS1-6); MS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-1); MS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-7)

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
RST.9-10.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.8 Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
WHST.9-12.5Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (HS-LS4-6)
WHST.9-12.7Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6)
Mathematics -
MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7)
MP.4 Model with mathematics. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
HSN.Q.A.1Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-4),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.2Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.3Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSS-ID.A.1Represent data with plots on the real number line. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.A.1Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.B.6Evaluate reports based on data. (HS-LS2-6)

HS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on quantitative analysis and comparison of the relationships among interdependent factors including boundaries, resources, climate, and competition. Examples of mathematical comparisons could include graphs, charts, histograms, and population changes gathered from simulations or historical data sets.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include deriving mathematical equations to make comparisons.]
HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales. [Clarification Statement: Examples of mathematical representations include finding the average, determining trends, and using graphical comparisons of multiple sets of data.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to provided data.]
HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem. [Clarification Statement: Examples of changes in ecosystem conditions could include modest biological or physical changes, such as moderate hunting or a seasonal flood; and extreme changes, such as volcanic eruption or sea level rise.]
HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of human activities can include urbanization, building dams, and dissemination of invasive species.]
HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on: (1) distinguishing between group and individual behavior, (2) identifying evidence supporting the outcomes of group behavior, and (3) developing logical and reasonable arguments based on evidence. Examples of group behaviors could include flocking, schooling, herding, and cooperative behaviors such as hunting, migrating, and swarming.]
HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.* [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on designing solutions for a proposed problem related to threatened or endangered species, or to genetic variation of organisms for multiple species.]
The performance expectations above were developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to explanations and designs that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

Engaging in argument from evidence in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using appropriate and sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s). Arguments may also come from current scientific or historical episodes in science.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

         Connections to Nature of Science

Scientific Knowledge is Open to Revision in Light of New Evidence

  • Most scientific knowledge is quite durable, but is, in principle, subject to change based on new evidence and/or reinterpretation of existing evidence. (HS-LS2-2)
  • Scientific argumentation is a mode of logical discourse used to clarify the strength of relationships between ideas and evidence that may result in revision of an explanation. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)

Disciplinary Core Ideas

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

LS2.D: Social Interactions and Group Behavior

LS4.C: Adaptation

LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

Stability and Change

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.ESS2.D (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS2.E (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); HS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7); HS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS4-6)

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.LS1.B (MS-LS2-8); MS.LS2.A (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6); MS.LS2.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS2.E (HS-LS1-6); MS.ESS3.A (HS-LS2-1); MS.ESS3.C (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6); MS.ESS3.D (HS-LS2-7)

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
RST.9-10.8 Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
RST.11-12.8 Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information. (HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS2-8)
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
WHST.9-12.5Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (HS-LS4-6)
WHST.9-12.7Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (HS-LS2-7),(HS-LS4-6)
Mathematics -
MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-6),(HS-LS2-7)
MP.4 Model with mathematics. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2)
HSN.Q.A.1Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-4),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.2Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSN.Q.A.3Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. (HS-LS2-1),(HS-LS2-2),(HS-LS2-7)
HSS-ID.A.1Represent data with plots on the real number line. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.A.1Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population. (HS-LS2-6)
HSS-IC.B.6Evaluate reports based on data. (HS-LS2-6)

* The performance expectations marked with an asterisk integrate traditional science content with engineering through a Practice or Disciplinary Core Idea.

The section entitled “Disciplinary Core Ideas” is reproduced verbatim from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Integrated and reprinted with permission from the National Academy of Sciences.