3-PS2-4 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

3-PS2-4   Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

3-PS2-4. Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Asking Questions and Defining Problems

Asking questions and defining problems in grades 3–5 builds on grades K–2 experiences and progresses to specifying qualitative relationships.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions

Crosscutting Concepts

 

   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

        Connections to Engineering,Technology,

                     and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Connections to other DCIs in third grade: N/A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

K.ETS1.A ; 4.ETS1.A ; MS.PS2.B

Common Core State Standards Connections: N/A

3-PS2-4   Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

3-PS2-4. Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Asking Questions and Defining Problems

Asking questions and defining problems in grades 3–5 builds on grades K–2 experiences and progresses to specifying qualitative relationships.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions

Crosscutting Concepts

 

   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

        Connections to Engineering,Technology,

                     and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Connections to other DCIs in third grade: N/A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

K.ETS1.A ; 4.ETS1.A ; MS.PS2.B

Common Core State Standards Connections: N/A

3-PS2-4   Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

3-PS2-4. Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Asking Questions and Defining Problems

Asking questions and defining problems in grades 3–5 builds on grades K–2 experiences and progresses to specifying qualitative relationships.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS2.B: Types of Interactions

Crosscutting Concepts

 

   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

        Connections to Engineering,Technology,

                     and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Connections to other DCIs in third grade: N/A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

K.ETS1.A ; 4.ETS1.A ; MS.PS2.B

Common Core State Standards Connections: N/A

* The performance expectations marked with an asterisk integrate traditional science content with engineering through a Practice or Disciplinary Core Idea.

The section entitled “Disciplinary Core Ideas” is reproduced verbatim from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Integrated and reprinted with permission from the National Academy of Sciences.