HS-ETS1-4 Engineering Design

HS-ETS1-4   Engineering Design

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-ETS1-4. Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • Both physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering design process. Computers are useful for a variety of purposes, such as running simulations to test different ways of solving a problem or to see which one is most efficient or economical; and in making a persuasive presentation to a client about how a given design will meet his or her needs.

Crosscutting Concepts

Systems and System Models

  • Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows— within and between systems at different scales.

Connections to HS-ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions Problems include:

Earth and Space Science: HS-ESS3-2, HS-ESS3-4 Life Science: HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-6

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

MS.ETS1.A ; MS.ETS1.B ; MS.ETS1.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

Mathematics -
MP.2Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-ETS1-4)
MP.4Model with mathematics. (HS-ETS1-4)

HS-ETS1-4   Engineering Design

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-ETS1-4. Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • Both physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering design process. Computers are useful for a variety of purposes, such as running simulations to test different ways of solving a problem or to see which one is most efficient or economical; and in making a persuasive presentation to a client about how a given design will meet his or her needs.

Crosscutting Concepts

Systems and System Models

  • Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows— within and between systems at different scales.

Connections to HS-ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions Problems include:

Earth and Space Science: HS-ESS3-2, HS-ESS3-4 Life Science: HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-6

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

MS.ETS1.A ; MS.ETS1.B ; MS.ETS1.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

Mathematics -
MP.2Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-ETS1-4)
MP.4Model with mathematics. (HS-ETS1-4)

HS-ETS1-4   Engineering Design

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-ETS1-4. Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

Mathematical and computational thinking in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to using algebraic thinking and analysis, a range of linear and nonlinear functions including trigonometric functions, exponentials and logarithms, and computational tools for statistical analysis to analyze, represent, and model data. Simple computational simulations are created and used based on mathematical models of basic assumptions.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

  • Both physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering design process. Computers are useful for a variety of purposes, such as running simulations to test different ways of solving a problem or to see which one is most efficient or economical; and in making a persuasive presentation to a client about how a given design will meet his or her needs.

Crosscutting Concepts

Systems and System Models

  • Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows— within and between systems at different scales.

Connections to HS-ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions Problems include:

Earth and Space Science: HS-ESS3-2, HS-ESS3-4 Life Science: HS-LS2-7, HS-LS4-6

Articulation of DCIs across grade-levels:

MS.ETS1.A ; MS.ETS1.B ; MS.ETS1.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

Mathematics -
MP.2Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-ETS1-4)
MP.4Model with mathematics. (HS-ETS1-4)

* The performance expectations marked with an asterisk integrate traditional science content with engineering through a Practice or Disciplinary Core Idea.

The section entitled “Disciplinary Core Ideas” is reproduced verbatim from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Integrated and reprinted with permission from the National Academy of Sciences.