HS-PS4-5 Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

HS-PS4-5   Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-PS4-5. Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.* [Clarification Statement: Examples could include solar cells capturing light and converting it to electricity; medical imaging; and communications technology.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessments are limited to qualitative information. Assessments do not include band theory.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information

Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS3.D: Energy in Chemical Processes

PS4.A: Wave Properties

PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation

PS4.C: Information Technologies and Instrumentation

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Systems can be designed to cause a desired effect.
   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Influence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.PS3.A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.PS4.A ; MS.PS4.B ; MS.PS4.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-PS4-5)

HS-PS4-5   Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-PS4-5. Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.* [Clarification Statement: Examples could include solar cells capturing light and converting it to electricity; medical imaging; and communications technology.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessments are limited to qualitative information. Assessments do not include band theory.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information

Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS3.D: Energy in Chemical Processes

PS4.A: Wave Properties

PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation

PS4.C: Information Technologies and Instrumentation

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Systems can be designed to cause a desired effect.
   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Influence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.PS3.A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.PS4.A ; MS.PS4.B ; MS.PS4.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-PS4-5)

HS-PS4-5   Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

Students who demonstrate understanding can:

HS-PS4-5. Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.* [Clarification Statement: Examples could include solar cells capturing light and converting it to electricity; medical imaging; and communications technology.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessments are limited to qualitative information. Assessments do not include band theory.]
The performance expectation above was developed using the following elements from the NRC document A Framework for K-12 Science Education:

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information

Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

PS3.D: Energy in Chemical Processes

PS4.A: Wave Properties

PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation

PS4.C: Information Technologies and Instrumentation

Crosscutting Concepts

Cause and Effect

  • Systems can be designed to cause a desired effect.
   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science

 

Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

Influence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World

Connections to other DCIs in this grade-band:

HS.PS3.A

Articulation of DCIs across grade-bands:

MS.PS4.A ; MS.PS4.B ; MS.PS4.C

Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy -
WHST.9-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. (HS-PS4-5)

* The performance expectations marked with an asterisk integrate traditional science content with engineering through a Practice or Disciplinary Core Idea.

The section entitled “Disciplinary Core Ideas” is reproduced verbatim from A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Integrated and reprinted with permission from the National Academy of Sciences.